Why Is It Called The Treaty Of Waitangi?

Who translated the Treaty of Waitangi?

Henry WilliamsBritain recognised New Zealand as a separate country because they accepted the Declaration of Independence that had been signed five years before.

Busby and Hobson together wrote a draft treaty.

A missionary, Henry Williams, and his son, Edward, translated it into Māori..

What was written in the Treaty of Waitangi?

The Treaty of Waitangi is an agreement made in 1840 between representatives of the British Crown and more than 500 Māori chiefs. It resulted in the declaration of British sovereignty over New Zealand by Lieutenant-Governor William Hobson in May 1840. Most chiefs signed a Māori-language version of the treaty.

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi relevant today?

The Treaty was a contract of respect between the British and Māori. … The Treaty now means there must be respect between Māori and non-Māori. It is important that the laws and rules today consider and respect both Māori and non-Māori ways of living.

What did the Treaty of Waitangi promise?

Te Tiriti o Waitangi) is an important agreement that was signed by representatives of the British Crown and Māori in 1840. … The Treaty aimed to protect the rights of Māori to keep their land, forests, fisheries and treasures while handing over sovereignty to the English.

What are the 3 principles of the treaty?

The three “P’s”, as they are often referred to, are the principles of partnership, participation and protection. These underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi. These principles are derived from the underlying tenets of the Treaty.

What does protection mean in the Treaty of Waitangi?

Protection involves the Government working to ensure Māori have at least the same level of health as non-Māori, and safeguarding Māori cultural concepts, values and practices.

What impact did the Treaty of Waitangi have?

The Treaty governs the relationship between Māori – the tangata whenua (indigenous people) – and everyone else, and ensures the rights of both Māori and Pakeha (non-Māori) are protected.

What are the main points of the Treaty of Waitangi?

Treaty of WaitangiThe Waitangi Sheet of the Treaty of WaitangiContextTreaty to establish a British Governor of New Zealand, consider Māori ownership of their lands and other properties, and give Māori the rights of British subjects.Signed6 February 18406 more rows

What does HAPU mean?

In Māori and New Zealand English, a hapū (“subtribe”, or “clan”) functions as “the basic political unit within Māori society”.