Question: Can Osteogenesis Imperfecta Be Passed Down?

How does osteogenesis imperfecta affect a person’s life?

Milder cases may involve only a few fractures over a person’s lifetime.

Additional complications can involve hearing loss, heart failure, spine issues, and deformities.

Osteogenesis imperfecta can sometimes be life-threatening if it occurs in babies either before or shortly after birth..

What is osteogenesis imperfecta Type 4?

Osteogenesis imperfecta type IV is a moderate type of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI; see this term), a genetic disorder characterized by increased bone fragility, low bone mass and susceptibility to bone fractures.

How common is osteogenesis imperfecta Type 2?

Patients with type II present multiple rib and long bone fractures at birth, marked deformities, broad long bones, low density on skull X-rays , and dark sclera. The overall prevalence of OI is estimated at between 1/10,000 and 1/20,000 but the prevalence of type II is unknown.

How long do you live with brittle bone disease?

It is estimated that approximately 25,000 to 50,000 people in the U.S. have OI. With good medical management and supportive care, the majority of people who have OI will lead healthy, productive lives and can expect an average lifespan. People with OI experience frequent broken bones from infancy through puberty.

How long can someone with osteogenesis imperfecta live?

The prognosis for infants with the most severe form of osteogenesis imperfecta is poor, and most children may not live beyond a few weeks. The prognosis for those with milder forms of the condition who receive good medical management is much better, and many people may have average lifespans.

Does osteogenesis imperfecta get worse with age?

It causes bones to break easily. In type 3 OI, your child’s body produces enough collagen but it’s poor quality. Your child’s bones can even begin to break before birth. Bone deformities are common and may get worse as your child gets older.

Do baby bones break easily?

The good news: Because a baby’s or toddler’s bones are more flexible than an adult’s, they actually don’t break as easily (they tend to bend or buckle instead). Small-fries also heal much more quickly than grown-ups, which means they’ll be up and running (or crawling or cruising) before you know it.

What is an OI baby?

Your child has been diagnosed with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). This is a rare condition that causes bones to be very thin and delicate so they break (fracture) easily. OI is sometimes called brittle bone disease. There are four types of OI that range from mild to severe.

Is Oi a disability?

Most people with OI experience physical disability. OI also can cause weak muscles, brittle teeth, a curved spine, and hearing loss. Most forms of OI are caused by abnormal genes that are passed down from one or both parents to their children. There are currently 11 types of OI.

How common is Oi?

OI occurs in approximately 1 in 20,000 individuals, including people diagnosed after birth. OI occurs with equal frequency among males and females and among racial and ethnic groups. Life expectancy varies depending on how severe the OI is, ranging from very brief (lethal form, OI type II) to average.

Does brittle bone disease affect teeth?

Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is always associated with bone fragility. In addition, OI may affect the growth of the jaws and may or may not affect the teeth. About half of the people who have OI have teeth that appear normal, and their major concerns are routine care.

Can osteogenesis imperfecta be prevented?

Because OI is a genetic disease, it cannot be prevented. It is important for the doctor of any expectant parents to know of the risk of OI for the infant.

Can osteogenesis imperfecta be detected before birth?

If OI is moderate or severe, health care providers usually diagnose it during prenatal ultrasound at 18 to 24 weeks of pregnancy. If a parent or sibling has OI, a health care provider can test the DNA of the fetus for the presence of an OI mutation.

Who is at risk for osteogenesis imperfecta?

An estimated 20,000 to 50,000 people in the U.S. have the condition. The estimated number varies greatly because milder forms of osteogenesis imperfecta can go undiagnosed. The greatest risk factor is heredity. If one parent has osteogenesis imperfecta, a child has a 50 percent chance of having the condition.

What organs are affected by osteogenesis imperfecta?

In more severe forms of osteogenesis imperfecta, there may be bone deformities, poor lung development and lung problems, a barrel-shaped chest, poor muscle development in the arms and legs. Osteogenesis imperfecta is caused by a faulty gene that affects the body’s ability to produce collagen.

Is Osteogenesis Imperfecta a type of dwarfism?

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) Type III is a dwarfism condition, with adults generally reaching a height of three feet, although profound short stature is often associated with the other three types as well.

Where is osteogenesis imperfecta most common?

Four main types of OI have been identified. OI type I is the most common and the mildest form of the disorder. OI type II is the most severe. In most cases, the various forms of osteogenesis imperfecta are inherited as autosomal dominant traits.

What are the signs of brittle bone disease?

Signs of OI include:bones that break with no known cause or from very minor trauma.bone pain.bone deformity (such as scoliosis or bowlegs)a shorter stature.brittle teeth (called dentinogenesis imperfecta)a blue, purple, or gray tint to the sclera (the whites of the eyes)triangular face shape.More items…

Can osteogenesis imperfecta be inherited?

When caused by mutations in the COL1A1 or COL1A2 gene, osteogenesis imperfecta has an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance, which means one copy of the altered gene in each cell is sufficient to cause the condition.

What age group does osteogenesis imperfecta affect?

It is characterised by bones that fracture easily and also bend. By the age of 6 years, the child has usually had multiple fractures and developed severe deformities. Children surviving till adulthood usually have short stature and disability.